The Revenant, church, exit & entry point

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Ok so a disclaimer to begin.

This will be my last post on The Revenant for a while I promise. I can’t help it, this film has got under my skin in a way that not many have in the last few years. The density, the spectacle, the cinematic wonder it really is a special piece of work. Even in January it will take something really special for it not to be my favourite film of 2016.

Through it all though one scene has stayed with me. Above all the moments of brilliance (and there are many) one scene leapt out more than any other and it is when Glass enters the crumbled edifice of the church.

This dilapidated structure has suffered even in these early days of civilisation but its foundation and structures remain. In fact within the fading church there is life as trees have put down roots bringing new life and growth.

It could be argued by some that the church today is in a similar position.

Dilapidated, fading, crumbling.

Recently I read an article about the majority of people in the UK claiming to have no religion . The truth is churches are closing, numbers are decreasing and desire for any notion of God is fading rapidly. People are searching though. People are searching for understanding. Searching for spirituality and searching in spaces other than churches to find it.

I believe there it still life in the church though. I believe that changes are coming. Changes that will remove old structures, old ways of thinking and an adaption to what church can/should in 2015. Dare I suggest church evolution??

That’s where the gap comes in.

While Glass stands in the church ‘grounds’ he stares at the picture of Christ on the wall at his crucifixion momentarily.

Glass has already experienced death and resurrection. The parallels are clear.

However my eye was drawn not to Christ on the cross but the gap in the wall.

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This gap is significant because this gap allows both entry and exit simultaneously. I would guess that its location is not accidental either.

It is not just the gap in the wall but the cross itself that is both entry and exit point.

In terms of the film and the church today the same points can be made.

Those who enter find shelter here.

Those who enter find signs of life they may not expect.

Those who enter can rest from the constant battering of their surroundings.

 

However the same can be said for those on the way out.

 

Those who exit are ready to take on the next stage of the journey.

Those who exit have sheltered, recovered and found life in its fulness.

Those who exit see a bigger picture and possibly a new frontier.

 

Articles can speak of decline.

The Revenant showed me the foundations and the gap that helps those coming in and those ready to go.

 

 

Cinema in 2016: The Overcomers

 

So far in 2016 I have been able to see 3 of the ‘big films’ of the year and I’ve enjoyed all 3 to varying degrees. All three are very different and yet all three have something in common. From arthouse leanings of The Revenant to the popcorn munching multiplex feel good of Creed one thing unites these three.

Overcoming the odds.

From the fringes of death, family circumstances, social classes, insecurities over legacy these protagonists all endure, all survive and in varying degrees thrive.

We root for these characters. We will them on to success. I am not ashamed to say that on seeing Joy I became unexpectedly emotional about mop sales!

These people though are not just the work of cinematic stories alone.  We meet these overcomers daily.

Those who struggle. Those who are weary. Those who refuse to be held back by their circumstance.  Those who wrestle to make it through the week. Those who seem to have a strength we can only hope for. Those who refuse to wilt. Those who overcome things we can only imagine in our darkest moments.

So while enjoying the success of those who overcome on screen.

Perhaps in 2016 it may be more worthwhile to get alongside and root for those who overcome daily around us.

 

Review: Creed

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Cinema has gone all nostalgic in recent times. Jurassic World, Star Wars of course and now the return of the Rocky franchise with Creed.

Nostalgia is not a bad thing in fact it can be great when executed in the right manner. Star Wars I felt carried this nostalgic feel off wonderfully. Reacquainting us with old friends and introducing us to new ones. I wish I could say the same about Creed.

Much like last years Mad Max review I fear I may be in the minority but Creed just didn’t hit the mark for me.

This is Rocky for a new generation and there should be nothing wrong with that but when you are of the generation that was blessed with Rocky first time round there really was nothing new or exciting to garner from Creed.

Even the first glimpse of Balboa himself was not enough to get a smile out of me during the film. All the old tropes are repeated again. The underdog story, the awkward love interest, it is all there rehashed for 2015 but now with added ‘gags’ about how old Rocky is.

Adonis Johnson (Michael B Jordan) plays the illegitimate child of Apollo Creed and much like his father in previous films he has a certain swagger and arrogance (as well a physical resemblance) that just make him unlikeable. I couldn’t invest the emotion in a character I couldn’t root for during most of the film.

However at the film’s climax my attitude shifted as the inevitable David v Goliath climax nearly brought me out of my seat. I have to say that the  fight sequences are very well staged, with some great camera work and a sense of realism that other boxing films could only dream of.

On leaving the screening I was amazed at how affected fellow viewers were. Some were emotional, tears had been shed, laughs had been shared. I came away wondering if I had watched something different?

If The Force Awakens receives a bit of flak for repetition of story and tropes how can Creed be received so rapturously??

Stallone won a GoldenGlobe for Best Supporting Actor. Did I miss something? If I did what was it?

 

Creed and I will spar again. I want to see what my friends and colleagues saw. I want to feel what they felt while they watched.  I want to get back in the cinematic ring with this film. Maybe next time I will be knocked out the way I hoped I would be first time round.

Creed is on general release from 15th January 2016.

Thanks to MovieHouse for advance screening access

Review: The Revenant

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I saw Alejandro Iñårritu’s latest film The Revenant six days ago. I tell you this not to show off but because after nearly a week has passed I’m still not sure exactly how I feel about this film.

I am certain I have seen something profound and yet I would struggle to tell you that this was a film that I wholeheartedly enjoyed.

Inspired by true events, The Revenant captures one man’s epic adventure of survival and the extraordinary power of the human spirit. In an expedition of the uncharted American wilderness, Hugh Glass (Leonardo DiCaprio) is brutally attacked by a bear and left for dead by members of his own hunting team. In a bid to survive, Glass endures unimaginable grief as well as the betrayal of his confidant John Fitzgerald (Tom Hardy). Guided by sheer will and the love of his family, Glass must navigate a vicious winter in a relentless pursuit to live and find redemption.

This is a film about the power of the human spirit but it is also a film about suffering and the endurance of pain. Not just the physical pain of the aforementioned bear attack (which is surely one of the most brutal moments in recent cinema) but the suffering caused mental anguish and the consuming desire for revenge.

So the question remains, is it enjoyable to watch a man suffer for slightly under two and  a half hours and watch him strive for vengeance?

My initial reaction was no. However having reflected over the last few days The Revenant has grown on me.

There are some incredible highlights to mention. The wonderful cinematography which elicits memories of Terrence Mallick and his love of nature. The opening sequence of the film where the hunting team is attacked by a native tribe is jaw dropping in it’s simultaneous beauty and brutality.

My favourite thing about this film though is  the performance of Tom Hardy as the wild eyed, manic Fitzgerald. If DiCaprio is to win Best Actor at this year’s Oscars then surely Hardy HAS to be this year’s best supporting actor.

The Revenant is littered with spirituality, the continual resurrection of Glass  regenerating throughout the film to become stronger on his journey home. One memorable scene in a crumbling church is particularly beautiful as Glass gazes on the image of Christ in a way recognising the near death and rebirth parallels of their lives.

The Revenant is a multi layered film that requires a viewer’s maximum concentration. If you invest enough in unpacking the complexities The Revenant is a cinematic wonder. If you are not fully engaged there is the chance that the film could appear pretentious and for art house lovers only.

The Revenant  is not a film to be enjoyed. Much like the vast frontier it plays out in The Revenant is a film to be explored.

The Revenant is on general release from 15th Jan 2016.

Thanks to MovieHouse for advance screening access