Cry the Beloved Country – the big is in the small

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CRY, THE BELOVED COUNTRY, Richard Harris, James Earl Jones, 1995

 

On Saturday evening I had the privilege of being at Stormont Presbyterian church to introduce Cry the Beloved Country. You can read my introduction in relation to cinema and justice here.

Cry the Beloved Country is set in South Africa church minister Steven Kumalo is summoned from his village to Johannesburg. He finds is son has been jailed in connection with the robbery and consequential death of a white man. The father of the deceased is an apartheid supporter. When they encounter each other they come to the unexpected realisation not only about their sons but their own humanity.

The film had many emotional moments, many scenes that moved me as I watched the various injustices suffered by many of the characters portrayed. There was one moment however that stood out above the others.

When Richard Harris goes to visit the club that his son provided for local ‘native’ boys he is approached by the club manager. Harris portrays a man who supports apartheid and even at his son’s funeral refuses to shake the hand of a black mourner. His son knew no such prejudice. He saw past skin tone, past societal class and saw humanity. He also saw a gap in society, a lack of provision and in founding this club plugged a hole others ignored in order to prevent boys in the area from getting involved in many of the dangers on the Johannesburg streets.

The manager approaches the mourning father and tells him of all the great things he did for them and then he says

“They were small things but what he gave us was himself”

This is often what people refer to as the light bulb moment. I sat at the back of the room went against all film watching senses and wrote the quote in my phone.

Often we feel that acts of justice must be carried out on a large scale. The grand gesture and in today’s world with as much publicity as you can get.

We want people to know the good we do. Instagram, Twitter, Facebook the ‘look at my great life’ mentality that social media instigates and nurtures can detract from what it should really be all about.

The greater act may be something small, something unseen by those around you, without publicity. Where you give away part of yourself in order that someone else gains.

In 2016 this goes against the norm. This is outside the box thinking. This idea of small meaningful heartfelt gesture over grandstanding would never be considered by some

If the meek are to inherit the earth. This way of acting maybe the most subversive method of seeing justice done we could ever encounter.