Review: Steve Jobs

steve-jobs-movie-poster-800px-800x1259-copy

A film about the rise of Apple guru Steve Jobs on paper may not sound like the most exciting film ever made. However when the that paper is written on by Aaron Sorkin I was always going to be interested. Add a dash of Fassbender in the main role and a dose of Danny Boyle in the director’s chair and I was excited before I even sat down.

High expectations can be the ultimate downfall of any review but thankfully I had nothing to fear. Steve Jobs is a whirlwind trip through the rise of arguably one of the most influential people of our time.

Set across 3 major time periods 1984, 88 and 1998 the film picks out 3 significant moments in Jobs’ career. Sorkin’s prose flits eloquently in highlighting the genius and flaw of Jobs’ character and Michael Fassbender is in excellent form (yet again) bringing this version of Jobs to life.

No punches are pulled in the depiction of Jobs. His flaws are laid bare and very apparent to the viewer. I was torn throughout trying to determine if Steve Jobs was likeable or despicable. His on-screen parenting skills, for example, need more work than his creative genius! It is refreshing to not see him lauded throughout as strangely a flawed genius may be more likeable in the longterm.

Kate Winslet, playing Jobs confidant Joanna Hoffman, almost steals the show in her role as the moral compass constantly at Fassbender’s side. Helping him to navigate business and family with simultaneous showings of adoration and brutal honesty is not an easy role but Winslet navigates it wonderfully.

The film’s ending was a little flawed for me. The attempt, at the last-minute, to tie up the loose ends and give a warm fuzzy feeling to the audience detracts from all the hard work in the balanced argument shown in the previous 118 minutes. This however is a very minor grievance and does not spoil  in any way what is a great piece of work from all involved.

The Social Network (the depiction of Facebook  founder Mark Zuckerberg), another Sorkin scripted film, is an easy and lazy comparison. However it must be noted that Sorkin has provided this cinema going generation with two biopics that take us inside the character of two men that many consider to be two of the most influential figures of our times.

His main achievement in doing so is to leave us to ponder if the characters displayed on-screen are worth our adoration in the first place?

With thanks to MovieHouse for screening access.

Steve Jobs is on general release from Friday 13th November 2015

Advertisements